Category: Best practices in price monitoring
Unexpected circumstances in which the whole world found itself due to the pandemic, forced businesses to make numerous changes. Nevertheless, Amazon still sovereignly rules the eCommerce market. It doesn’t take much to create a seller profile and to start selling products. However, the true challenge for brands lies in the fact of managing those sellers....
You invested some serious time into creating your MAP policy. It’s very visible on your website, and you also made sure to send it out to all retailers that you’re collaborating with. No place for a mistake, right?  Yet, when you search for your products on the web, you find that there’s been a MAP violation. Some...
If you’re an online seller, then you’re aware of how challenging it is to keep track of all market changes. One of those changes is the price fluctuation. In order to stay ahead of the competition, you need to follow all relevant price changes. This can be a very daunting and time-consuming task.  For example,...
Product matching in Price2Spy Previous topic: (Part #9) ML does work, but it’s not magic Overall results did vary from one industry to another, from one client to another – is also very much depended on factors N (number of matching candidates) and M (the ease of match approval vs establishing a match fully manually)...
Product matching in Price2Spy Previous topic: (Part #8) Product matching via ML: Testing on various industries/languages Next topic: (Part #10) Product matching via ML: The results Since we said that we cannot afford to have wrong matches in Price2Spy, we were particularly careful when testing ‘false positives’ – these were matches where ML scored a...
Product matching in Price2Spy Previous topic: (Part #7) Product matching via ML: Post-processing Next topic: (Part #9) ML does work, but it’s not magic The Product Matching project had been going on for a while, now was the time to remember our initial decisions, and put them to the test: Languages – we have too...
Product matching in Price2Spy Previous topic: (Part #6) Evaluating ML training results Next topic: (Part #8) Testing on various industries/languages This part was logically the most difficult to comprehend, at least for me. Let’s give it a try: We have 50K products from Set A and 40K products from Set B. We have already eliminated...
Product matching in Price2Spy Previous topic:  (Part #5) ML training Implementation Next topic: (Part #7) Post-processing How do you know if your ML model works fine? The answer is seemingly simple: you run all of the potential matching combinations through Random Forest (RF), in order to get a matching score of each combination. Then, if...
Product matching in Price2Spy Previous topic: (Part #4) Preparing the ML training set Next topic: (Part #6) Evaluating ML training results Our very first implementation step was a bit non-standard. While most of ML is done in Python, Price2Spy is a Java shop. We respect other technologies, but our love and our choice go to...
Product matching in Price2Spy Previous topic: (Part #3) For ML experts – why is product matching so difficult? Next topic: (Part #5) ML training Implementation This part was particularly tough. When performing the product matching, one would need to match Set A (Products from Website A) to Set B (Products from Website B). However, in...

About Price2Spy Blog

This blog is a place for eCommerce professionals to discuss ideas, methodologies and strategies to compete more effectively in the ever more tightening world of online retail. We explore things like competitive price monitoring, competitor business intelligence, competitive pricing, and counter-intelligence in general.

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